Most of us have been seduced into our hobby, maybe when thumbing through a rule book or a publication such as White Dwarf, or perhaps like me just by chance and I saw some well painted models, arranged on a beautiful table with nice scenery and it called to us.
 
hobby

I thought on this post for some time. I wanted to cover painting in the tournament scene as its where I do most of my gaming and I think as you have paid money, arranged travel and accommodation etc. When at events it’s important to present an army not necessarily done outstandingly well, but certainly to the best of your abilities. To talk more on the subject I asked my good friend and very experienced painter Adam or @elfordminis as some know him on twitter to share a few words on painting and commissions.

My names Adam Elford and I’ve been in the hobby for 14 years now. I first started painting an Undead army with my friend and he always asked me to paint his character models. I was 12 and I remember the Nagash model.

Back in the day I loved it and as far as I remember I painted it quite well. I had a break from the hobby when I moved house and started fully about 8 years ago. I now have a fully painted Skaven army and have just started on my second Skaven army. Call me a sucker for the little critters. I also do commissions from single models to conversions and armies.

skaven

I’m quite new into the tournament scene, so can’t judge the quality of painting in the previous years, but following certain people and their armies on blogs, seeing the more creative ideas in models and paint schemes; I would definitely say the quality of armies is on the increase.

Painting can mean different things to different people in the hobby. I love painting, converting models and armies; I tend to paint my models to a high standard. Even though they are being used to play games with every week and will possibly get broken. It’s very satisfying when you have a beautiful army on the battlefield that you can be proud of, it is even nicer when opponents’ compliment you or you get nominated for best painted. To others in the hobby it’s about the gaming side. I don’t like to play armies which aren’t painted, so I agree with a 3 colours and based minimum requirement for tournaments. It doesn’t take too long to paint and then you can still focus on the gaming side, without having to make your opponent play against base coated or grey models.

skaven2

I think tournament organisers need to create a basic guide, rather than soft scores to encourage people to paint their models, three colours and basing for example, and stick to it. If players don’t abide their models are removed as casualties and they can’t use them. This promotes playing with fully painted armies, from three colours to beautifully painted and converted, whilst not penalising those who can’t paint and rewarding those who can. Of course best painted awards should stay for those who wish to pursue such goals.

Be sure to follow me on twitter, to see my ramblings, painting and I hope to see you at a tournament near me!

skaven3
I feel Adam makes some valuable points here, most events try soft scores as a way to get people to paint minis. So for example: you use three colours on the miniature and gain X number of battle points, more for effort etc. You always find the guys at the top have this covered as they want the full amount of points available.
However there is a number of people who because they feel they won’t do well they decide not to bother, a simple guide and a “you’re not using unpainted models” style would certainly give them that push.
So get the brush out, pop some paint on a pallet and get experimenting, try inking, mixing different paint textures, highlighting, and dry brushing. A good place to look for tips and see his beautiful models is Adams site elfordminis.blogspot.com or the breacher18 Community Forums right here!
 
I would like to hear people’s thoughts on this and see pictures of peoples own works of art.

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  • Chebhear

    Loved those miniatures. The details are very intricate.